"Frank's skill in asking the right questions is un-mistakable, and is at the core of his leadership philosophy.

The power of these questions cannot be underestimated, especially if you want to lead and not manage."
—John Cave
Westhaven Worldwide Logistics

If not otherwise stated—all postings © Frank D. Kanu. All rights reserved.

First Page Previous Page   You are on page 9 of 30   Next Page Last Page

5678 9 10111213

Posts

Archive for the 'Teams' Category

Go practice.

Show me a CEO who in her first week doesn’t mention the words ‘culture’ and ‘change’ in a press release or internal memo and I will write to congratulate her personally.

Newly appointed leaders like to talk about changing their business culture because effecting that kind of change sounds like the universal panacea to business challenges that all senior managers look for.

And quite possibly, they are right… they’re just wrong to shout about it because they are probably setting themselves up for failure.

Why? Because culture is a bit of a will o’ the wisp—elusive when trying to pin it down and difficult to define and describe. It’s as much in the atmosphere and professionalism or otherwise exhibited in the Board Room as it is in the middle manager who spends an hour a day smoking outside the front entrance and the junior member of staff who walks by the eyesore piece of litter that he cannot remember discarding the day before.

Culture isn’t changed overnight either. It won’t be sorted in a couple of conferences. Nor will it be sorted our by the ‘core values’ campaign that quickly peters out to be replaced by next year’s initiative.

No. Culture changes are not effected from the top down. They’re effected from the inside out. Identify an individual or group of people or department that exhibits desired behaviours. Encourage these, add to them… grow these people into acknowledged examples of “how we’d like to do things round here“.

Reward them.

Their peers will notice and they will over time adopt the behaviours.

That’s the theory anyway.

Go.

Practice.


Tags:
 

This blog-entry is protected by a digital fingerprint:785273ed81985582c8a1be62f78c9459

02/11/2010

The conventional definition of management is getting work done through people, but real management is developing people through work.
Agha Hasan Abedi

Tags:
 

This blog-entry is protected by a digital fingerprint:785273ed81985582c8a1be62f78c9459

What Would You Do?

The team you are part of has a team player that is everything but a team player.

To make things worst—this team player is beloved by the boss. No matter how bad he acts, the boss forgives.

This specific team player gets rewarded for having an attitude—while the others are stuck with the dirty work.

What would you do?

Talk to the boss?

Leave the team?


Tags:
 

This blog-entry is protected by a digital fingerprint:785273ed81985582c8a1be62f78c9459

Do You Reward Your Players?

Life is full of examples of how business shouldn’t be done. And still…

A couple of days I watched the scrimmage of some local football teams. The tackling skills of the one player got acknowledged and applauded not by his own team, but the coaches of the opposing team.

Now, step back and look at businesses.

Can’t you easily count many where employees are treated like that: Ignored by the own management but recognized by others?


Tags:
 

This blog-entry is protected by a digital fingerprint:785273ed81985582c8a1be62f78c9459

Fit In Or Get Lost!

The coach of a youth sport team said the he doesn’t care about talent. “Those that come to me either fill the position I put them in or they can go!”

While one might argue how easy or difficult it is to spot talent in a youngster—wouldn’t you agree that this is the wrong approach?

What happened to try-outs; to find out weaknesses and strengths? Can you really properly coach or mentor without knowing the talents of the players?

Sure, coaching a team of 11 stars isn’t easy. But neither is directing a movie with 11 stars; leading a stars only sales team; managing a group of excellent programmers…
You get the point!

Still, many try to lead by forcing the “Fit in or get lost” rule.

Do you?


Tags:
 

This blog-entry is protected by a digital fingerprint:785273ed81985582c8a1be62f78c9459

Are Team Members More Dependable Than Managers?

You bet!

Most managers can hire and fire team members.

But team members are very limited in firing or hiring managers. Maybe with the exception of the whole team complaining.

This dependability leads to dynamics managers must understand.
  • Needed information might be withheld because out of fear of a weakened position.
  • Information that should have stayed within the team is blurred out to strengthen someone’s position.
  • Responsibility grows with growing power; but most want power without responsibility.
  • As soon as one side abdicates responsibility the needed balance isn’t given anymore.
  • Every team member has a hidden agenda that usually neither matches the team goal nor helps the team to reach its goal.



Tags:
 

This blog-entry is protected by a digital fingerprint:785273ed81985582c8a1be62f78c9459

Military And Leadership

When talking about leadership style, leadership philosophy, leadership principles and leadership strategy we expect that the leader acts and communicate in specific ways. Leading someone without a strategy more often than not lead to anything but the result you expect.

Would it be right to say that Military first normalized and standardized behavioral rules and expectations?

For a commander the proper understanding and execution of every order is a matter of life or death.

Early on systematic and standardized orders become part of military life. As a leader—if you fail to communicate, it will be more the exception than the rule that your goals are realized. Lead with a purpose and ensure your followers are aware of that purpose.

Do you think that’s the reason why so many think that officers are always good leaders?


Tags:
 

This blog-entry is protected by a digital fingerprint:785273ed81985582c8a1be62f78c9459

Are You Mobbed?

A great many think that mobbing External is just a social issue, but far from it—mobbing External becomes a problem for the business. But how do you know if you are mobbed External?

The probably best research is done by Heinz Leymann External.

Below a few hints that help you to determine if you a mobbing victim or take part in mobbing:
  • You are called names
  • You are cut off when trying to say something
  • You are constantly criticized
  • You receive verbal or written threats
  • There is a lot of talking about you behind your back
  • You are isolated
  • Nobody is allowed to talk with you
  • You are not getting any work
  • You are the only one doing hazardous work
  • You are forced to do work that is well below your knowledge level



Tags:
 

This blog-entry is protected by a digital fingerprint:785273ed81985582c8a1be62f78c9459
First Page Previous Page   You are on page 9 of 30   Next Page Last Page

5678 9 10111213

This blog is designed to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter covered. If legal advice or other expert assistance is required, the services of a competent professional should be sought.