"Frank's skill in asking the right questions is un-mistakable, and is at the core of his leadership philosophy.

The power of these questions cannot be underestimated, especially if you want to lead and not manage."
—John Cave
Westhaven Worldwide Logistics

Did Your Mind Already Give the 2 Week Notice?

Studies have shown that the most named reason for the two week (mind) notice is the employee's supervisor.
What to do when the boss is a failure?

 

Wesley Chapel, FL (PRWEB) August 19, 2006 -- Studies have shown that the most named reason for the two week (mind) notice is the employee's supervisor.

Did your mind already give the notice? Here is good news: You might be still able to fix the situation.

How?

In Frank Kanu's book "Stop Telling? Start Leading!
The Art of Managing People by Asking Questions"
(ISBN 0-9774056-1-3)
Step 3 "Take Responsibility" has the chapter:
"What to Do When the Boss Is a Failure":

"What indeed. Well, you can always run away. Get a new job--maybe even one with more money and better benefits. Of course, you have no guarantee that in your new job the boss will not be an even bigger failure. But more importantly, consider what running away will do to your reputation -- among your colleagues and among your team members. Making a move under these circumstances might actually slow down your career.

Just as your success is tied to your team, your boss's success is tied to you.

Instead of being frustrated with the boss, how can you help create a more productive environment? One way is with praise. Praise? That's right. I don't mean undeserved praise. What I mean is this: suppose you're not pleased with some new procedure the boss has implemented. You could confront the boss and say how you feel. How far do you think that would get you? Bosses don't like being criticized. But if you present your complaint in a nicer package, you may have better luck. Start with a compliment. Don't be insincere or smarmy, just point out something that you think the boss deserves an extra "thanks" for. Then you can mention your complaint -- except that you should phrase it as a suggestion. The boss may not agree to your idea, but you haven't been arrogant or disrespectful, so you'll likely be taken more seriously.

When was the last time you complimented your boss?"

Frank Kanu offers phone coaching to help the frustrated employee and/or their supervisors.

"Frank's skill in asking the right questions is un-mistakable, and is at the core of his leadership philosophy. The power of these questions cannot be underestimated, especially if you want to lead and not manage."
--John Cave, Westhaven Worldwide Logistics

Contact:
Genius One, Inc.
Frank Kanu
f@geniusone.com
http://www.geniusone.com